Dr. Stephanie T. Dance-Barnes

Assistant Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology


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Department: Life Sciences
Office Location: W.B. Atkinson Science Building, Room 404 Winston Salem State University
Phone: 336-750-3237
Fax: 336-750-3094
Email:  dancest@wssu.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Biography

Dr. Stephanie received her Bachelor of Science degree in Biology/Pre-Medicine at Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) in 1997.  While at ECSU she was an active member of the honors program and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.  She then went on to complete her Masters in Biology at North Carolina Agricultural Technical State University in 2001, while simultaneously working as a senior research laboratory technician/manager in the Departments of Comparative Medicine and Cancer Biology at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.  She later in 2007 became the first African American female to receive her PhD from Wake Forest University School of Medicine in the area of Cancer Biology and Toxicology. During her graduate studies Dr. Dance-Barnes received numerous research, abstract, platform talk, travel, and scholar awards from organizations such as American Association of Cancer Research, Society of Toxicology, and Genetic Environmental Mutagenesis Society.  She also received research funding and fellowships from the National Institute of Health, National Cancer Institute, and the American Foundation for Aging Research, for her work dealing with lung tumor initiation, promotion, and progression in mouse models.  During the 2006-2007 academic year, she was also awarded the Lucinda Robbins Fellowship from Wake Forest University (WFU) Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in recognition of outstanding academic and research expertise, demonstrated leadership, outstanding interpersonal skills, and commitment to the ideals of excellence in academic research.  Only one award per year is given to a single student across all of the biomedical programs at WFU.     She then went on to complete her Post-Doctoral work as a research associate in the prestigious laboratory of Dr. Charles Perou of the University North Carolina Chapel Hill Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (LCCC).  It has always been Dr. Dance-Barnes’ desire to return to a historically black college/university similar to her alma mater ECSU in order to pass own her knowledge and expertise in which she has accumulated over her years of study and work, just as it was afforded to her.  Dr. Dance-Barnes is now presently an Assistant Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology in the Department of Life Sciences at Winston Salem State University (WSSU).  Since being at WSSU she has been awarded numerous professional and teaching awards for her innovative strategies in the classroom, as well as serving as the Department of Life Sciences Biology Co-coordinator, acting Project Strengthen director, the University’s General Education Information Literacy Co-Chair, and an active member of the STEM board.


Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Cancer Biology/Toxicology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine
  • MS, Biology, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University
  • BS, Biology/Pre-Medicine, Elizabeth City State University

  • Research and Project Interests:

  • Research focus is the characterization of the biological diversity of tumors, specifically breast, using genomics, molecular genetics, and cell biology, in order to develop improved and more targeted therapies that are specific for each tumor subtype.

  • Selected Publications:

    Dance-Barnes, S.T., Kock, N.D., Moore, J.E., D’Agostino, R.B., McCoy,T.P., and Miller,M.S.  Lung Tumor Promotion by Curcumin. Carcinogenesis. 2009 Jun;30(6):1016-23.  

    Dance-Barnes, S.T, Kock ND, Floyd HS, Moore JE, Mosley LJ, D’Agostino RB, Pettenati MJ and Miller MS.  Effects of Mutant Human Ki-rasG12C Gene Dosage on Murine Lung Tumorigenesis and Signaling to its Downstream Effectors.  Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 231 (2008) 77-84. 

    Witschi, H., Espiritu, I., Dance, S.T., and Miller.:  A mouse lung tumor model of tobacco smoke carcinogenesis. Toxicol. Sci. 68:  322-330, 2002. 

    Floyd, H.S., Farnsworth, C.L., Kock, N.D., Mizesko, M.C., Little, J.L., Dance, S.T., Everitt, J., Tichelaar, J., Whitsett, J.A., and Miller, M.S.:  Conditional expression of the mutant Ki-rasG12C allele results in formation of benign lung adenomas:  development of novel mouse lung tumor model. Carcinogenesis 2005  26:  2196-2206.  

    Yu , Zhen, Loehr C.V., Fischer K.A, Louderback, M.A., Krueger, S.K., Dashwood, R.H., Kerkvliet, N.I., Pereira, C.B., Jennings-Gee, J., Dance, S.T., Miller, M.S., Bailey, G.S., and Williams, D.E. In Utero Exposure of Mice to Dibenzo[a,l]Pyrene Produces Lymphoma in the Offspring: Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor. Cancer Research 2006 Jan 15;66(2):755-62. 

    Jennings-Gee,J., Moore J.E., Dance, S.T., Kock, N.D., McCoy,T.P., Carr,J.J., and Miller,M.S. Strain-specific induction of murine lung tumors following in utero exposure to 3-methylcholanthrene. Mol Carcinog. 2006 Sep;45(9):676-84.


    Additional Information:

    Human breast tumors show great diversity in their morphologies, clinical histories and in their responsiveness to chemotherapy. The genomic characterization of human breast tumors has  identified at least five biologically. This wide tumor diversity poses one of the central challenges to the accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of breast cancers. The focus of my lab is to characterize the biological diversity of tumors using genomics, molecular genetics, and cell biology, in order to develop improved and more targeted therapies that are specific for each tumor subtype.  Presently my lab is utilizing mouse mammary tumors cells cultured from mice in which K14-Cre has deleted p53 and BRCA1.  These mouse mammary tumor cells appear to initially possess a basal-like phenotype and are responsive to a number of breast cancer treatments such as, Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, and PARP inhibitors.  Serial transplants of these tumors have resulted in them presenting a more claudin-low phenotype, and also being resistant to treatments.  Members of my lab are presently utilizing several alternative natural cancer treatments in an effort to overcome the treatment resistance exhibited by these mouse mammary tumors.  It is the ultimate goal of my lab to use genomics, genetics, cell culture, and animal models to decipher the underlying biology of the molecular subtypes of breast cancer, and then using this biological information develop therapies that are specifically targeted against each of these distinct subtypes of breast cancer.   In addition to breast cancer, there are other types of cancer cells being utilized in the lab , for example, leukemia, to determine the effectiveness of various chemotherapeutics, as well.  Normal cell lines of various types are also being used to determine carcinogenic capabilities and mechanisms of action of  various natural occurring compounds. 

    1993-1998   Highest GPA in the Department of Biology Award (Elizabeth City State University)

    Ebone Evans - Biology Major / Neuroscience Minor

    Winston Salem State University (WSSU) Minority Biomedical Research Support-Research Initiative Student

    2013 – University North Carolina at Chapel Hill MED Program

    Summer 2012 - Diversity Summer Internship Program (DSIP) at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University

    2012 Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students

    2012 WSSU College of Arts and Sciences Academic Achievement Award

    Summer 2011 - WSSU Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) program

    Summer 2011 - Wake Forest University Excellence in Cardiovascular Sciences Summer Research Program

    3rd place WSSU Department of Life Sciences Scholarship Day Poster Presentation Winner

    Jatyra River - Biology Major

    Winston Salem State University (WSSU) Minority Biomedical Research Support-Research Initiative Student

    Summer 2012 - Diversity Summer Internship Program (DSIP) at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University

    2012 Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students

    2012 WSSU College of Arts and Sciences Most Improved Student Award

    Amber Williams - Biology Major

    Summer 2013 – VCU Health Sciences and Health Careers Pipeline Program

    2013 Emerging Researchers National Conference

    1st place WSSU Department of Life Sciences Scholarship Day Oral Presentation Winner

    2013 WSSU College of Arts and Sciences Academic Achievement Award

    Domonique Battle - Biology Major

    Winston Salem State University (WSSU) Minority Biomedical Research Support-Research Initiative Student

    Summer 2012 - Diversity Summer Internship Program (DSIP) at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University

    Summer 2013 - Diversity Summer Internship Program (DSIP) at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University

    Glaxo-Smith-Kline Mentees

    Kellse Norris-Woods

    2013 Emerging Researchers National Conference

    Brittany Glover

    2013 Emerging Researchers National Conference

    American Association for Cancer Research, Member Since 2005

    Society of Toxicology, Member Since 2000

    Specialty Sections: Carcinogenesis, Molecular Biology

    Special Interest: Women in Toxicology

    Genetics and Environmental Mutagenesis Society, Member Since 2000

    Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Member Since 1995

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    601 S. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive

    Winston-Salem, NC 27110

    Phone: (336) 750-2000



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